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Completed translations Paragraph from a Dutch article (NL → EN)
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Wiki: w:c:currencies

Items: http://www.egmp.nunaar.be/artikels/ClaudeCharlierA4.pdf -- I only need the paragraph under "De munten van Katanga"

Extra information:

Signature: Dser (talk) 14:56, August 16, 2015 (UTC)


The coins of Katanga In 1960, Katanga secceded from Congo. Charlier was approached by minister of Finances Jean-Baptiste Kibwe and asked to design coins for Katanga. He made a large paper design of the front- and flipside of a 5 and 1 franc piece, as well as a model in copper of the front side in 3 copies, 10~15 centimeters in diameter. Through a representative of the English company ICI (Imperial Chemical Industries), the contacts went through England to have the coining happen there. The design was proposed to president Tshombe, who approved the case. Unfortunately however, Charlier never received the design and the models back, but there have been photoes conserved of it, displayed here. The coins were made by the Mint of Birmingham[1] and brought into circulation in 1961. A golden off-metal strike[2] of the 5 francs coin was also made.

Caption of picture on the right:

Model front, copper Ø 10 ~ 15 cm

Caption of picture at the bottom:

Design of the coins of Katanga, (in thin lines also the 5 francs)
with at the bottom space for the signatures of Tshombe and Kibwe

(next page) Katanga flourished well for a short time, and the peak of this was the Foire Internationale[3] in July 1961 at Elisabethstad. This had to emphasize the mine activities. At this event, there was also a contest to design postal stamps that Charlier participated in and won. Six “Foire Internationale 1961” stamps were published with three different motives: agriculture, transport and industry. Each stamp also showed three katanga-crosses, the symbol of Katanga. At that time they were also available in Belgium for collectors. Notice that the coins also show three katanga-crosses: two on the frontside and one on the flipside.

Caption of picture below paragraph:

Postal stamps of Katanga, Foire Internationale 1961, designed by Claude Charlier
Printed by Hélio Courvoisier s.a.[4], La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland

Checkmark DoneYATTA ヽ( ° ヮ° )ノ @fandom ☆ 2015年09月10日、04:25:52 

With Google Translate

Checkmark Done Zmario 22:21, August 16, 2015 (UTC)

Exact translation: 1960 Katanga broke away from Congo. Charlier was approached by Minister Finance Jean-Baptiste Kibwe coins and asked for Katanga design. He made a large paper design of the front and side for a 5 and 1 franc piece, as well as a model in copper from the front in 3 specimens, 10 to 15 cm diameter. Via a representative of the British company ICI(Imperial Chemical Industries) went thecontacts with England to the coins there let beat. The design was introduced to President Tshombe who accepted the case. unfortunately Charlier got the design and replicas never back, but there are pictures stored left, pictured here. The coins were Currency beaten Birmingham and in 1961 brought circulation. There was also a golden exit from the 5 francs.

Corrected: In 1960, Katanga broke away from Congo. Charlie was approached by Minister Finance Jean-Baptiste Kibue and asked for a Katanga design for the coins. He made a large paper design of the front and side for a 5 and 1 franc piece, as well as a model in copper from the front in 3 specimens, 10 to 15 centimeters in diameter. Through a representative of the British company ICI (Imperial Chemical Industries), the coins went through the contact in England. The design was introduced to President Tshombe who accepted the case. Unfortunately, Charlier never got the design and replicas back, but there are pictures stored (see left). The coins were used as currency in Birmingham, and in 1961, were brought into circulation. There was also a golden exit from the 5 francs.

If anyone can translate this better or correct it better, feel free to do so! Zmario 22:21, August 16, 2015 (UTC)

References Edit

  1. Birmingham Mint maybe.
  2. This seems like jargon: the Dutch word "afslag" means "a mint coined like a usual mint, but in a different metal". These could be used as a gift or so, but not to be brought in circulation. I believe the English for this is "off-metal strik", but you would probably be able to place this.
  3. International Fair? This might've been an event similar to the world exhibitions or something, not sure.
  4. I think this is Latin for "sine anno", without date.
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