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  • On your profile page, you say you've been studying English since "two hundred eleven or thirteen'. I don't know about in Brazilian Portuguese, but in English we usually write years as numbers. You'd write "2011 or 2013". In British English, we say "twenty eleven", "twenty thirteen" etc. I think that in American English it's more usual to say "two thousand eleven', "two thousand thirteen' and so on.

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    • I think I need to lend more attention about this, I wrote "two hundred" instead of "two thousand". However, thanks for advising me. 

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    • Indeed. And I would advise you to write 2011 and 2013 in numerals instead of words. That's what a native English speaker would write.

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    • I've really been talking about adverbs and searching about them since one month ago. 

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      Now, I'm constrained over these phrases, "I mightn't really" and "I really mightn't".

      No doubt, I prefer using "I really mightn't" or "I really might not". Do all of these forms sound good to you? Which one do you use the most? 

      ________________________

      You can help me as you wish, because I'm just facing off many difficulties by experiencing the learning of a new language. 

      Thank you. 

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    • They're all acceptable English. Personally, I haven't used any of those forms for a long, long time. Could you give me some sentences using them? I think you're thinking of situations where I'd be more likely to say, "I probably won't", as in, "I probably won't finish it tonight."

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    • Grammatically, English is so polemic... 


      ...and actually, I'm always using these three phrases below:

      "I might really not be good at English" (To me, it sounds so good)

      "I really mightn't be good at English" (To me, it's okay)

      "I mightn't really be good at English" (I know this is the most used order and structure. However, is it just me who hate using this form or do you either do?)


      And... Honestly, what do you think about these orders? 

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    • I would recommend that you use the third form, "I might not really be good at English." It is the most natural and, as you said, the most commonly used form. The other two forms are both OK and I don't see any problem with them.

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    • Okay. I'm done! 

      I'm happier now. I thought all these forms above could've been wrong because I thought it all was a matter of correctness, which  is completly wrong.

      Now I get, "You can choose the order as you wish since it's correct". 

      You've helped me a lot. Just keep being nice. 

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    • Well of course, there are thousands of examples of instances when changing the word order in English creates a sentence that means something completely different or one that doesn't mean anything at all. You were just lucky that those three phrases all made sense and all meant the same thing. Still, I'm happy to be of help. And thank you so much for calling me "nice". It's just after ten o'clock in the morning here and I'm about to go to work. Your compliment has got my day off to a great start!

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    • "You were just lucky that those three phrases all made sense and all meant the same thing."

      What doesn't make sense in English, it will probably not make sense in Portuguese and vice versa.  

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    • True. The reason I wrote that is because most of my teaching experience has been teaching native speakers of Chinese, Japanese, Polish and Turkish, languages which are much more different from English than Portuguese is. What makes sense in those languages doesn't necessarily make sense in English and vice versa.

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    • I'm having more and more problems. When I think about a phrase or a sentence, I can't build it or even think about it, because I have (a) letter soup in my mind and I almost definitely can't even catch a single letter of this soup. Do you think it is normal? 

      Like for example, I'm a person who dislikes using dictionaries because they don't show me how to use a single word. I'm always interested in knowing if its verbs whom are being studied by "me are" just transitives or intransitives, because I need to know if they are followed by a preposition. As a consequence it all have been confusing me. 

      Sorry for asking you too many questions.

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    • Yes, I think it's normal. But you are obviously getting stressed. Take a study break and relax. Have some fun while you're still young.

      For when you do feel ready to study again, I recommend that you buy English Grammar in Use by Raymond Murphy (ISBN 9780521532891). It also sounds like you haven't found the right dictionary yet. Maybe you should get a good English-English learner's dictionary, like the Collins Cobuild. You can find its contents at http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english

      Take care. I hope that everything goes well for you.

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    • I don't know if this will be of any use to you, but I use this site all the time at work for English-Spanish translation, and they have a section in Portugese. http://www.wordreference.com/pten/

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    • Patton, I had never seen a good site such as "word reference". It really shows us how to use many prepositions through many taken examples of sentences or phrases. This is what I like and must be on my use. 

      Simon, I think I already heard about some dictionaries named "Collins". As soon as possible I'll buy one of these dictionaries. They are interesting. 

      Well, I'm always stressed and taking things seriously, like for example, I would study for 5 hours, if it is necessary because I'll obtain much information. I love winning over myself even this is an obsession.

      This is all. Thank you both. 

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    • Guys, I "babelled" my profile, and then I decided to babel it based on my En-Us-2 and En-Gb-0. How do you think about these levels of my En-us and En-gb? Should I upgrade or reduce, or just keep these levels as they literally are? I just need an opinion about my doubt.  

      Babelled (verb/neologism) = Evaluation of someone's babel base on levels. I invented this verb because I thought it's needed. 

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    • You're definitely not at zero level in British English. British English and American English are really not that different. The differences between Brazilian Portuguese and Portuguese of Portugal are much greater than those between British and American English. You might have some difficulty understanding spoken British English if you haven't heard the accent before. But you can read this, can't you? That means you can read British English! I think you're probably right in saying that you're level is now en-us-2 and will soon be en-us-3. I think that, for now, you should put your level as en-gb-1.

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    • A FANDOM user
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